Steve Palmer – Unblinking Sun

Steve Palmer - Unblinking Sun

The ethos and energy of punk rock first inspired Steve Palmer to pick up a guitar, but it was his discovery of the music of John Fahey in 2012 that renewed and deepened that interest. For his first full-length, Unblinking Sun, he filters cosmic krautrock, drone, and psychedelic improvisation through the vernacular of the American fingerpicked folk tradition.

We have a couple of excellent tracks from it to stream or download, Cassini and Six Dollar Sunglasses. We’ll wager that fans of William Tyler or Clan Nugent will find much to like here.

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New Video: Saint Saviour – I Remember

Saint Saviour releases her new album of layered, lush, pastoral folk, In The Seams, on November 4th through Surface Area.

The lead single is the achingly beautiful I Remember, watch the video below.

“I remember when we would hang about in hollow trees
New sounds, sitting smoking leaves
Walking past boarded up windows gets you down
Shit town, knew you couldn’t breathe”

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New EP From Kyle Adem

New EP From Kyle Adem

We were big fans of Kyle Adem’s 2012 release Armour, and he has returned with a new single from his forthcoming EP Beautiful Dreamer (due on October 14th via Ghost Motel Records).

With a signature guitar-driven narrative, Good Morning, August conjures imagery of leaves changing, the end of a season, and with it, an uplifting change in attitude that finds the indie/folk musician exploring greater pop-sensibilities than previously.

Have a listen, really lovely stuff.

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Speedy Ortiz – Lost Something In The Hills

For Rookie Magazine, Speedy Ortiz have recorded a cover of re-discovered German folksinger Sibylle Baier who recorded an album’s worth of songs thirty years ago and did nothing with them until her son sent one to J Mascis who helped get the songs reissued in 2006 as an album called Colour Green.

This is Lost Something In The Hills and you can download it below as well as listen to the lovely original.

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Seven Songs You Should Have Heard This Week

1. Meatbodies – Tremmors
2. Foxygen – How Can You Really
3. J Mascis – Wide Awake
4. Marissa Nadler – Hollywood Forever Cemetery Sings (Father John Misty cover)
5. Allo Darlin’ – I Wanna Be Sedated (Ramones cover)
6. Purling Hiss – Learning Slowly
7. Cymbals Eat Guitars – Warning

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Video: Emily Capell – Who Killed Smiley Culture?

We are loving this track, Who Killed Smiley Culture? by Emily Capell, a moody acoustic musing over the suspicious death of the pivotal rapper. Delivered with a memorably witty vocal line and matched perfectly with this curiously compelling monochrome video.

The single is out via Blang! tomorrow and can be downloaded via iTunes.

 

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Wooden Wand – Waveland

Wooden Wand - Waveland

Lightning have announced their first quarterly, part of a larger subscription series the label has put together with four quarterly gonzo style magazines and a 20 album series where artists have been asked to contribute a unique side project or edge creative statement.

Lightning quarterly one includes:
Five new albums by early Brooklyn infamous rock legends People of the North (Oneida), mythological songwriter and long standing MM fave Wooden Wand, Arizona desert outlaw (and another MM fave) Ohioan, primitive futurist guitar poet William Tyler, and rebel rocker and virtuoso guitar shredder Cy Dune.

Here is a track from Wooden Wand’s AZAG-TOTH, a record (apparently) exploring the musical idea of Metempsychosis and recorded at home onto his trusty Tascam 8 Track digital recorder without band or producer. Waveland is classic James Jackson Toth, deceptively simple, profound, intelligent and more proof (were it needed) of a songwriter who seemingly can effortlessly deliver what others strive for years to do, and fall short.

“the off season, it’s always hell,
you can tell each highway from the smell,
Mama’s borders they would scream and shout,
My half-brother kissed me on the mouth”

It doesn’t get much better than this. Treat yourself.

 

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Joe Jack Talcum – Home Recordings: 1993-1999

Joe Jack Talcum - Home Recordings: 1993-99

For most people the idea of an intimate evening with Joe Jack Talcum playing songs in their living room sounds terrifying given the reputation of his better-known band The Dead Milkmen, but the appearance in 2011 of Home Recordings: 1984-1990 revealed a sadder, more intimate side to a songwriter better known for his sense of humour.

Now via HHBTM Records, comes the second volume, from one of America’s great unheralded songwriters, pulled from an archive that makes you want to hear more, to wonder what else might be in there. Home Recordings: 1993-1999 contains a cosmos of emotion—from funeral marches to rave-ups, irreverence to lament—sometimes even in the same song. A solo album in every sense of the word, it’s like eavesdropping on a soliloquy.

Check out Madonna’s Weep with it’s tweaked-out 3am surreality that recalls Robyn Hitchock’s I Often Dream of Trains.

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