Posts Tagged ‘Fritjof Norrmo’

Day four of our countdown of our favourite 200 songs of the past 10 years.

140 Chelsea Light Moving – Groovy & Linda (2012)

 

A distorted, bloody jam in tune with the bloody, violent nature of the 1960s shooting it narrates. Any Sonic Youth undertones? What do you think.

 

 139 Dan Auerbach – Heartbroken, In Disrepair (2009)

The gritty guitar sound sets up a soulful, dirty blues where hopelessness finally overpowers determination.

 

138 Spectrum Meets Captain Memphis – The Lonesome Death Of Johnny Ace (2008)

Biopic-epic groover shows the two musicians playing off a southern fried radiation telling the tale of a famous singer’s Russian Roulette tragedy on Christmas day.

 

137 Houndmouth – For No One (2015)

Spare and epic. Surreal and vivid. Plaintive and slyly humorous. An absolute gem of Dylan-esque storytelling that manages to be anything but derivative.

 

136 Deer Tick – Chevy Express (2011)

Sombre, reflective, and undeniably sobering. Chevy Express is the soundtrack to a heavy heart and lonely regret washed by the first light of an early morning dawn and may well be the best thing they’ve ever done.

 

135 Howling Owls – Family Tree (2010)

 

Sinister, noir-ish folk from the Howling Owls. Family Tree is ominous, forbidding, baleful – all the things we love from one of our favourite discoveries of the past ten years.

 

134 The Silver Jews – Strange Victory, Strange Defeat (2008)

David Berman’s lyrics were amongst the sharpest, wittiest, pithiest and most potent in the whole of indie-rockdom. The rumbling Strange Victory, Strange Defeat’s opening verse is Squirrels imported from Connecticut / Just in time for fall / How much fun is a lot more fun? / Not much fun at all and it just gets better from there…

 

133 Tweak Bird – A Sun / Ahh Ahh (2010)

 

Brilliant mix of full-on old-school metal riffing with psychedelic overtones and an absurdly heavy climax. Rock on dudes.

 

132 A.A. Bondy – I Can See The Pines Are Dancing (2009)

Both intriguing and evocative, A.A. Bondy’s lovely, road-weary voice conveys a rarely felt depth of experience on the back of a melody steeped in warm melancholy.

 

131 Angus Stone – It Was Blue (2012)

Borrowing a Stooges’ style riff, It Was Blue is a stunningly good, modern day excursion into fuzzy 70s psychedelic rock.

 

130 Joe Pug – Hymn 35 (2009)

Classic singer-songwriter fare, but set apart from the crowded competition by the the consistently thought-provoking lyrical wordplay and the chance to holler along in the car with I have done wrong / I will do wrong / There’s nothing wrong / With doing wrong.

 

129 James Arthur’s Manhunt – Killzone (2016)

 

An intense, tribal, maelstrom of churning, filthy guitars and pounding percussion that veers into space rock by way of spaghetti westerns and Italian horror films.

 

128 Nightjar – Poor Man’s Son (2008)

 

A wonderfully simple tale of a son done wrong set to a classic bluegrass inflected folk-strum.

 

127 Southerly – Desolation Row (2013)

 

Darkest of dark pop, infectious melody, ominous drone, sparing song structure and astute lyricism.

 

126 Protomartyr – Pontiac 87 (2015)

 

Brilliantly hypnotic riff. Brilliantly hypnotic reflection on a dispiriting Papal visit to Pontiac, Michigan in the late eighties.

 

125 Julie Ruin – I Decide (2016)

 

Somehow manages to be outrageously catchy, while simultaneously sounding like an angry bunch of wasps trapped in a jam jar.

 

124 Low – Plastic Cup (2013)

 

Moody and smart-ass sarcastic story of substance abuse, a lifetime of dependence on others, and the soul-crushing future of pointless drug tests. All set to an understated, super-low tempo, and wonderful co-ed vocal harmonies between Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker.

 

123 Port O’Brien – I Woke Up Today (2008)

 

A chaotic, swelling modern day seafarer’s shanty. And the biggest damn sing along chorus in the whole list.

 

122 Airborne Toxic Event – Sometime Around Midnight (2008)

What can you say. Overblown, theatrical, bombastic and yet still one of the greatest indie rock songs of the past ten years. The bluster eventually revealing the true pain and sorrow of desolate heartbreak.

 

121 Fritjof Norrmo – Set Me On Fire (2015)

 

Swedish singer-songwriter’s endearing and somewhat nostalgic tale of a brief, but passionate love encounter. A true heart warmer.

 

Don’t forget to check out tracks 200-181, 180-161, 160-141.

MM Best of 2015 no guitarFollowing Barry-Sean’s welcome return to the MM bosom yesterday, we are equally delighted to now introduce The Italian Job’s debut entry into MM’s Best Of annals (and don’t try saying that when you’ve had too much eggnog).

Providing us with a welcome European flavour, and writing better in her second language than we can in our first, we invite you to sample her pleasingly punk-tinged favourites of 2015.

20 Chris Staples – Dark Side of the Moon
19 Ex-Cult – Stick the Knife In
18 Abandoned Delta – I Never Lived in New Orleans
17 Protomartyr – Pontiac 87
16 Faith Healer – No Car
15 Creepoid – American Smile
14 John Grant – Disappointing
13 Slaves – Ninety Nine
12 Low – What Part of Me
11 Elephant Stone – The Devil’s Shelter

10 Protomartyr – Why Does It Shake
Strong and hypnotic this track takes you through a slow and unavoidable declining of the mind. While the singer aggressively and repeatedly shouts out that he’s never gonna lose it (almost to persuade himself of it, more than anyone else), the first cracks suddenly appear to precisely prove him wrong! The rhythm completely changes to mimic a slow and heavy heart beat as the background to confused, anxious and slightly mad lyrics. At this point the mind is lost, and me too! I can’t shut this song out of my head!

 

9 Traams – Silver Lining
A great tune from Traams. Maybe it’s for its brilliant guitar work (but that, admittedly, you’ll find in any of their pieces), or maybe because of the same-y, captivating and catchy chorus. Despite the title it does not end well, however. “So go along, accept it all, it’s over”. No Silver Lining then. Oh well. Brilliant song anyway.

 

8 Fritjof Norrmo – Set Me on Fire
This is a bit of an unexpected one for me. With an overplayed classic country guitar, an overindulgent silly voice and a chorus adorned with a round of equally frivolous ‘para-pa-pa’, I should really dislike this song. And yet, I have inexplicably never been able to ignore it; allowing myself instead to get completely sucked into Fritjof Norrmo’s endearing and somewhat nostalgic tale of a brief but passionate love encounter. Every time I listen to this song, my little heart warms up a tiny bit.

 

7 Chaika – The Mirror
Wow! This is my killer track! What’s not to love about it? Dark, with superb drums and glorious guitar, this piece ticks all the boxes for me! I have just learnt that Leeds-based Chaika have only been together since late 2014 and have, apparently, done no wrong so far. With a single like The Mirror they have definitely set the bar very high for my estimation and earned a decent spot on my top 10 best songs of the year. With no doubt, I will keep an eye on them.

 

6 This is the Kit – Silver John
A stunningly epic song. It deservedly kept on sneaking up my top 10 to finally set at number 6. Its vibe is dense and covered in mystery. Who or What Silver John is, is not quite clear until, with her reassuringly beautiful voice, Kate Stables innocently drops foreboding lyrics such as “you apocalypse on us, yes” and “best get used to dark, used to wet”. Only then you realise she is poetically reflecting on none other than the impending end of the world. And she does it in such a mesmerising style that, all at once, the apocalypse does not seem so awful, after all. This song sends shivers down my spine.

 

5 Mikal Cronin – iv) Ready
Talking of killer tracks, here’s another one. Another great one! Packed with adrenaline and outstanding guitar work this song is one that, once played, I cannot easily get out of my head.

 

4 Man of Moon – The Road
Provided I’d have a clear road ahead of me (and provided it’d be ‘legal and safe to do so’ – right, not a daredevil me!) I would sit in my lovely little (but remarkably fast) car, put the foot down and have this song as loud as possible and, obviously, on repeat!! Albeit with a slight mainstream-y tinge, this song is a great goosebumps-inducer for me, pretty much from the get go. Holding the steering wheel while shaking my head to the fantastic guitar and bass, I cannot get enough of this song. I doubt it would have the same effect if listened to while stuck in traffic though.

 

3 Decemberists – Carolina Low
Carolina Low is a bare, simple, and undeniably menacing song. There is something dark and intriguing about this piece that I cannot quite place. So much so that it proudly sits at number three. Its brilliantly executed guitar work is accompanied by a sound which is evocative of old American tales from old times. I learnt The Decemberists’ lead singer wrote this song just hours before a performance for Q Live in Portland. “I didn’t know what to play so I thought I would write something for it,” Maloy told the audience. Well, well done Mr Maloy. It took you a few minutes to write a song that will stay with me for a very long time!

 

2 Slaves – Feed The Mantaray
Bring.It.On! Laurie Vincent’s amazing guitar comes on – heart pumps a little faster. Immediately after, Isaac Holman attacks with the drums. That’s it, from this point on my very excitable ‘twenty-something’ is channelled out of my slightly older self and I can’t help head-banging (provided nobody is looking, of course) to this brilliantly arrogant, cocky and humorous piece. Holman’s increasingly agitated and shouty state throughout the song at his own aggressive and obsessive need to know ‘whaaaat‘ (and somebody answer him, please!) makes the whole experience all the more amusing. These are two mischievous, talented young boys (Laurie Vincent has just won Total Guitar “Best New Guitarist of 2015, by the way) who, in my eyes, can afford being as brassy as they wish because have demonstrated all along the full credentials to play cracking music. And they do so all the way. Long live Slaves!

 

1 Kurt Vile – Pretty Pimpin
My very favourite song of the year! From the moment I was invited to take part in this year’s Top 10 I knew this would be my number one. And how couldn’t it have been? With wicked lyrics vaguely reminiscent of a Peter Crumb*-esque case of split personality, Kurt Vile brilliantly takes us through his befuddled state of mind where, one moment, all he wants ‘is to just have fun‘ and the other he ‘proceeds to brush some strangers teeth‘… Can’t keep up! The man in the ‘meeeerror‘ is fabulously mad and I love him for that.
* Seven Days of Peter Crumb – Jonny Glynn (read it at your peril)

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You can see our countdown of our favourite 100 Tracks of the year here (100-76), (75-51), (50-26), (25-1) and favourite 30 Albums here (30-16), (15-1).

MM BEST OF 2015

It’s the third instalment of our end of year list of our favourite tracks of 2015. Today we enter the top half of the chart with numbers 50 through to 26.

 

50 Mutual Benefit – Not For Nothing

 

49 Rats On Rafts – Last Day On Earth

 

48 Slaves – Ninety Nine

 

47 Diet Cig – Harvard

 

46 Decemberists – The Harrow And The Haunted

 

45 Laura Marling – I Feel Your Love

 

44 Elephant Stone – The Devil’s Shelter

 

43 Harrison Storm – Sense Of Home

 

42 Protomartyr – Dope Cloud

 

41 Noah Gundersen – Slow Dancer

 

40 Karen Meat & The Players – Pizza & Beer

 

39 Du Blonde – Chips To Go

 

38 Bjork – Stonemilker

 

37 Chaika – The Mirror

 

36 Marika Hackman – Drown

 

35 Gun Outfit – Gotta Wanna

 

34 Traams – Silver Lining

 

33 Fat White Family – Whitest Boy On The Beach

 

32 Abandoned Delta – I Never Lived In New Orleans

 

31 Jeffrey Lewis + The Bolts – Scowling Crackhead Ian

 

30 Fritjof Norrmo – Set Me On Fire

 

29 James McMurtry – Copper Canteen

 

28 Tow’rs – The Kitchen

 

27 Hanni El Khatib – Moonlight

 

26 Gaz Coombes – 20/20

 

Check in tomorrow for the final countdown to our number one choice of the year. Click here for numbers 100-76 and here for 75-51.

Friday Round Up

Our in-box is once again sinking slowly in a deluge of new music and videos, and even once we’ve deleted all the e-mails about house bangers, dance remixes, and other such nonsense we’re still left with an unfathomably large number of songs to listen to…

However, listen we do, and here is a short selection from all around the world (Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, Sweden, USA and the UK) of those that made us prick up our ears with interest.

First up is the pulsating guitar riffs of Brooklyn-based indie/fuzz rockers Lightouts who have dropped their first release in more than a year with their More Than Ever maxi-single. Stream / download it here.

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Then we have MOSES who mix the sounds of 60s pop and psychedelia like Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young and The Electric Prunes with 90s shoegazers like The Brian Jonestown Massacre and Slowdive, and top it all off with a healthy mix of 70s soft rock like Fleetwood Mac and Steely Dan. Have a listen to Opium, or download from Bandcamp.

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Taking the templates laid out by the likes of Black Sabbath, MC5 and The Melvins and skewing them with youthful, experimental abandon, Copenhagen’s Baby In Vain are back with their ferocious new track of disorientating blues-sludge titled Muscles – it is a powerful return for the band.

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Denver’s Kissing Party deal in infectious two-minute drunken guitar pop songs that stick in the mind like glue. Known for their jangly guitars, raucous live shows, and charming blend of boy/girl vocals, new album Looking Back It Was Romantic But At The Time I Was Suffocating is a perfect introduction to the band with their takes on debt, regret, heartbreak, hair dye and Pennsylvania. Download / listen to Justine.

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Edward David Anderson (who’s also known for his work with the late great midwest rock band Backyard Tire Fire), has announced the release of his next studio album, Lower Alabama: The Loxley Sessions, due 16th October via Royal Potato Family. The first single from the collection is Jimmy & Bob & Jack – it is vintage outlaw rock ‘n’ roll storytelling.

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Battle of Flowers are an Adelaide based duo playing a dark, steely and evocative blend of the darker elements of indie rock and alternative country. Lost And Found comes from their new self-titled EP.

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Fritjof Norrmo has based several of his songs on events and people he has encountered during the years. But there have not only been travels and new faces; a large part of his youth was spent in a small society in the Swedish countryside. In the midst of smoke from secret cigarettes, he was sitting in the window, dreaming of a more meaningful time. Double-single Set Me on Fire consists of two songs about dreams of love and a disdain for the place you’re stuck at.

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Earlier in the year we posted Hidden Charms’ excellent tune It’s Time, and now they are releasing a limited edition 7″ titled Dreaming Of Another Girl which is another perfectly judged track of gently swirling 60s influenced psych-rock.

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And lastly for this morning we have Fort Worth, TX-based band, Telegraph Canyon who will shortly release their new album You From Before. Check out the ambient tinged indie rock of Why Let it Go, infused with hints of garage rock and soul.

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