Posts Tagged ‘September Girls’

Apologies for the uninspiring heading. However, with time against us and a plethora of new tracks from some of our favourite artists piling up in our in-box we’ve decided to lump them all together and share five new tracks in one go.

So without further ado, enjoy new music from Future of the Left, William Fitzsimmons, Teleman, September Girls and Eskimeaux.

How good is that?

 

 

 

 

 

The latest instalment of our regular feature of songs you really should have wrapped your ears around in the past seven days…this week has a bumper crop of eight cracking new tunes.

1. Father John Misty – Bored In The USA
2. The Decemberists – Make You Better
3. The Dodos – Competition
4. Emmy The Great – Swimming Pool
5. The Districts – 4th And Roebling
6. September Girls – Black Oil
7. Terrible Truths – False Hope
8. Jessica Pratt – Back, Baby

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Mad Mackerel's Best Of October 2014

After a too long hiatus, we’ve resurrected our best of the month mix capturing our favourite tunes from October’s posts, plus a couple of new tracks too. So more than 25 songs to discover…dive in!

The September Girls – Veneer
Dark-hearted pop smothered in drenched feedback

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God Damn – Horus
A red-hot burning molten pot of pop hooks and grinding, bludgeoning riffs and rhythms.

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The Voyeurs – Stunners
Indie-psych rockers new single with nods to the tribal stomp of the Glitter Band and Iggy Pop to the colder, starker vignettes of Berlin era Lou Reed.

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Dirt Dress – Revelations
Cultivated racket of guitars, horns, and drums that mixes surf rock with synths in a curiously beguiling way.

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Amazing Snakeheads – Can’t Let You Go
More trashcan voodoo punk blues without parallel.

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Ultimate Painting – Ten Street
Excellent retro style, casually lacksadasical, take on jangly indie rock with echoes of Pavement and Lou Reed.

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The Wharves – The Grip
Gracefully minimal psych-rock with fuzzed out folk invoking the reverberated spook of 60s girl groups topped with crunchy guitar and thunderous drumming.

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Maggie Bjorklund – Fro Fro Heart
Brooding, profound and unforgettable standout from Danish pedal steeliest and singer’s new album.

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Gwyneth Moreland – Slaughterhouse Gulch
Perfect blend of authentic, classic country that feels as genuine as it does timeless.

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Menace Beach – Come On Give Up
Fuzzily insistent indie rock.

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Elijah Ocean – Bring It All In
Particularly fine example of classic backwoods, porch-rocking folk.

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The Brian Jonestown Massacre – Heat
Eastern tinged, gritty psychedelia.

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The Wave Pictures – Pea Green Boat
Dr Feelgood style blues riffs melded with typically quirky and literate vocals.

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Eaves – As Old As The Grave
Rich, tender, melancholia from new singer-songwriter.

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Elliott Brood – Nothing Left
Rollicking, infectious Americana cut through with bluegrass, folk-rock and a definite glam-rock flavour.

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Daddy Issues – Ugly When I Cry
Wonderful slab of downbeat grungy pop that drips with acerbic irony and a healthy dose of cynicism.

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The Don Darlings – If You Can’t Be Good
Masterpiece of southern gothic Americana

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Parkay Quarts – Uncast Shadow Of A Southern Myth
Townes Van Zandt, Warren Zevon, and Dylan are evident points of departure this lonesome tale about “two men tragically colliding in the deep south“.

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Viet Cong – Continental Shelf
Gloomy, brooding, ghostly, dissonant post-punk.

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Diarrhoea Planet – Bamboo Curtain
Catchy old-school style punk.

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Saint Agnes – Where The Lightning Strikes
Blues stomping, dirty rock n roll number with psychedelic organs, screaming guitars and haunting harmonica.

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Justin Townes Earle – Dreams (Fleetwood Mac cover)
Classic take on a classic track.

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Kyle Adem – I Go On
Haunting, satirical autobiography of loss and the person one becomes in solitude, sung with convincing desperation.

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Curtin – Big Blue Crown
Hazy track that creates a slow-burning and hypnotic soundscape.

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To finish we have new tracks from brilliant psych-rockers Pontiak, the burrowing, ominous Underneath Us Like A Snake, and Soft Fangs stunningly gorgeous and woozy Dog Park.

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Four videos to set pulses racing from Lola Colt, The Franklys, September Girls and finishing with Meat Wave’s insanely catchy punk rock.

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(Download the whole album on a pay-what-you-want deal from Bandcamp).

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New EP From The September Girls

Drawing inspiration from the likes of Phil Spector, The Velvet Underground, The Cure, My Bloody Valentine and The Jesus And Mary Chain, the September Girls play reverb-soaked noise-pop of the finest order.

They first came to our attention at the start of the year with their excellent debut album Cursing The Sea, (see our posts here) and we thoroughly enjoyed their set at the Great Escape in Brighton.

Now they are back with a brand new four track EP of dark-hearted pop smothered in drenched feedback, entitled Veneer. Each of the four tracks is written and sung by a different member of the band.

Have a listen to the title track.

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Mr Popper stays well away from sharks, but still went to see Jaws...

Mr Popper stays well away from sharks

On reflection, it was a day for the Celts at the Great Escape, and the Aussies, and even the Argentinians…

We kicked off the day with a set from New Desert Blues, whose mix of folk, country and indie rock has graced previous posts here on MM. They have a debut album in the pipeline and happily the songs they showcased from this stood up well, particularly set-opener Milk And Honey, which is a hypnotically powerful guitar stomper and we’d go as far as to say the best thing we’ve heard from them to date.

As Mr Popper went off to catch the laid back indie jangle of Jaws, I caught the end of a fine set of haunting folk from Ireland’s I Have A Tribe, which had more than an echo of Bonnie “Prince” Billy about it, and then an excellent set of noisy, garage pop from Dublin’s September Girls where motorik rhythms and fuzzy guitars collided to almighty good effect.

A quick trip to see Night Engine, who were new to me, was rewarded with an experience like stepping back into late 1970s New York where funky guitars and tribal drumming recalled early Talking Heads, art punk and classic disco. It was in stark contrast to the sombre, dense guitar patterns of Scottish duo Honeyblood who had drawn a big crowd, but seemed to struggle to distinguish their combination of shoegazing guitar and drums into anything more than one-dimensional noise pop.

Las KelliesThe evening saw a trip to the Fire Records showcase, part of the Alternative Escape schedule and when we eventually found the venue, via numerous trips up and down the beach, we were treated to a short but highly energetic of ramshackle garage punk and irreverent wordplay from the antipodean Scott & Charlene’s Wedding, finishing with recent album standout Jackie Boy.

Next up, all the way from Argentina, were three-piece Las Kellies who brought a dose of much needed sunshine to the town with a fizzing set of bubblegum pop, punk rock and slashing guitars. Forty minutes, seventeen songs, and not a duff note to be heard.

Suitably revved up and having learnt from the previous evening, we headed up to the Hope pub, where thirty minutes of queuing was to prove more than worth it as long-standing MM faves The Dune Rats shambled on stage to provide one of the highlights of the festival so far.

Dune RatsThe three lads from Brisbane were clearly here for a good time and despite it being possibly the hottest venue I have ever been in, proceeded to tear up the stage with a mix of skate punk surf rock, and stoner pop. Joyfully idiotic banter “we gave up smoking this morning, but started again this afternoon“, and songs about dope, wanking, lying around, and more dope set the tone. And frankly, any band that can happily roar their way through a repeated chorus of “Dalai Llama, Big Banana, Marijuana” have got to be doing something right in my book.

So the stage was set for headliners the Amazing Snakeheads, a Scottish band whose fearsome live performance has been receiving rave reviews up and down the country with their brutal mix of rockabilly, junkyard punk, swamp blues and voodoo rhythms.

Stalking the stage like some kind of demented boxer, frontman Dale Barclay bristles with menace and palpable violence, attacking his guitar with a savagery I don’t think I’ve ever witnessed before. While the band create tribal, hypnotic swathes of rhythm behind him he howls, shudders, beseeches, and threatens in equal measure, his face set in a series of rictus grimaces.  Songs like I’m A Vampire, Here It Comes Again, and Where Is My Knife are given a white-hot, blistering intensity that is impossible to resist.

Building the tension and the potency of the show with every song, the set finishes in a cacophony of impossibly heated percussion and driving guitars ended abruptly by Barclay as he uses his guitar to drive a route through the dripping crowd and out through the exit.

God knows where he is now…

Possibly the best live performance I’ve seen for years and years.

 

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The Great Escape - A PlaylistToday, Chris T Popper and I are heading south to Brighton and our first visit to the Great Escape festival.

There are a whole host of bands we’re looking forward to seeing, from the South American punk-pop of Las Kellies, the angst of Gambles, the spectral folk of Mirel Wagner and the junkyard blues of the Amazing Snakeheads, to the stoned slacker indie of Dune Rats and the growling garage of Theo Verney.

Perhaps best of all though is that element of surprise, the anticipation of stumbling across something new that makes an event like this such good fun. And there is plenty of scope for that here with over 400 bands playing sets. Happy days.

Until then, have a listen to some of the highlights that we have already picked out – these are all high on our must-see list…a twenty five song salute!

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MM Shorts 532: September Girls

Sister from September Girls’ album Cursing The Sea (out on Fortuna POP!) makes us feel all nostalgic for the sticky dance floor of the “alternative” nightclub of Oxford’s Zodiac all those moons ago. From the thrumming guitar intro and the tribal drums to the Siouxsie style “whoo-hoos“, and all wrapped in a post-punk icy chill. Marvellous.

You can catch them at SXSW from tomorrow (Austin Pysch Festival show) and everyday thereon to March 16th. If I was there, I’d be going…

It’s Friday.

Time for videos featuring a gently heartfelt confrontation of a friend’s heroin addiction from Deer Tick, gorgeous baroque folk from rising star Jordan Lee aka Mutual Benefit, the reverb drenched sound of the excellent new single from September Girls, and to finish a mournful tear-jerker with spine-chilling lyrics from Carousels & Limousines.

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Videos of the Day

We have no less than six excellent videos and songs to help you begin to welcome in the weekend. First up is Beachwood Sparks and their 70s inspired home footage homage is a perfect fit for track Make It Together.

By way of contrast, the video for fuzzed-up indie rockers, September Girls new single Heartbeats, draws on influences of old Hammer Horrors and photographers such Ryan McGinley and Ellen Rogers. The clip is a waking dream depicting the materialization of anxiety and dread into a haunting shadowy character.

Talmud Beach play relaxed, hypnotic, lo-fi blues boogie, with a twist of psychedelia and krautrock. The fan-made video for the outstanding and irresistible Hobo Don’t Mind A Little Rain sits somewhere between MGMT and Tame Impala. And then we have DZ Deathrays striking, alien-infused, new video for Northern Lights.

Next up is the video for Wild Ones‘ song From Nothing from their new album Keep It Safe. It was filmed in the ghost town of Shaniko, Oregon – in the video lead singer Danielle Sullivan walks defiantly through town towards an unknown terror as everybody else runs the other direction.

And lastly we have the feelgood charm of Caravan Of Thieves video for Dead Wrong – melding acoustic folk, swing and gypsy into a melodic whole that reminds us of MM faves The Keston Cobblers’ Club.

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