Posts Tagged ‘Districts’

best of the weekPart two of our weekly round up of the best tracks from the past seven days kicks off with another fine track from Laura Marling’s new album, and an excellent new single from The Districts.

We have another brash slab of riotous rock from Charly Bliss and something equally propulsive from Hiccup (should keep the indie kids happy). Trance Farmers slow things down with their ominous new single, while Cotillon’s new track is a masterclass in hazy slacker rock. Finally, White Reaper round things off with the title track from new album The World’s Best American Band.

  1.  The Districts – Ordinary Day
  2. Laura Marling – Nothing, Not Nearly
  3. Trance Farmers – Witches
  4. Hiccup – Neverwhere
  5. Charly Bliss – Percolator
  6. Cotillon – Alex’s Room
  7. White Reaper – The World’s Best American Band

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

best of the weekA bumper week for new tunes, many with an Americana flavour,  including songs from The Head & The Heart, Lydia Loveless, Frankie Lee, The Low Anthem and Band Of Horses. We have a tasty REM cover from The Districts as well, and the return of Beck and of Montreal amongst twelve new tracks for you to delve into.

Enjoy!

  1. Band Of Horses – Whatever, Wherever
  2. The Head & The Heart – All We Ever Knew
  3. The Low Anthem – Ozzie
  4. Of Montreal – It’s Different For Girls
  5. Lydia Loveless – Longer
  6. Beck – Wow
  7. The Districts – Nightswimming (REM cover)
  8. Frankie Lee – High And Dry
  9. Heaters – Garden Eater
  10. The Veils – Axolotl
  11. Rafi Bookstaber – We Can Find A Way
  12. Wymond Miles – Divided In Two

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Districts will release Chlorine as their new single on 17th July. The track is the latest to be taken from their current album A Flourish And A Spoil, which is out now on Fat Possum Records.

Chlorine is (another) four minutes of authentic rock from a band with serious sonic clout, and has proved to be a firm favourite with live audiences.

Stream it here.

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Friday Round Up

It’s Friday and a trawl through the overloaded MM in-box has been well overdue. So here are a few tunes, new and not quite so new, that are well worth giving some ear-time to0…

And your starter for ten:

Inspired by 70s Punk and 90s Brit Pop, NYC band Public Access T.V. have announced the release of their debut EP in the US on Terrible Records. The first track to be shared the from the EP is Metropolis.

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Citing wildly diverse influences: Gary Glitter, Slade, uppers, cartoonish depression, Iggy Pop, 70s iron on font, Sex Pistols, booze and Hawkwind, Cheena’s unifying theme is defiantly one of late ’70s proto-punk. Did I Tell You Last Night? comes from their forthcoming self-titled 7″ via Sacred Bones.

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Wartime Blues is an indie-Americana octet based in the small, mountainous town of Missoula, Montana. Their sound has been compared to Nebraska-era Bruce Springsteen, Wilco and the more acoustic aspects of Yo La Tengo. Build A Sun comes from their third long player April, Texas.

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Human Form is a new London punk band consisting of ex/current members of Vertical Slump, Keel Her, Slowcoaches, Feature, Warmhammer et al. They play a twisted form of doomy punk, informed by the likes of The Wipers, Moss Icon and 80s SST Records, as well as the recent output from the DIY scenes of Olympia and Sydney, but with distinctly British-sounding vocals. Listen to new song, Pith.

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Chick Quest’s music is something akin to Violent Femmes or Talking Heads mixed with music from old 60s spaghetti westerns and pulp films. This is Girl On Fire from their debut record, Vs. Galore, which comes out on April 20th.

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Plum are a Denver based psych rock band aiming to place the psychedelic 60s and early 70s into a modern context. This is their recently released second single Behind Your Man.

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Human Behavior are a dark freak-folk group from Tucson, AZ who have just released the second album in a trilogy encompassing Catholic guilt, drug addiction, obsessive compulsive disorder, and ethnic identity confusion. Consisting of 13 songs or chapters, listen to Chapter 2.

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Ancient River, the sonic brainchild of singer/songwriter James Barreto, is an ever-changing snapshot of rock n’ roll and psychedelia, flowing from the swampy roots of the American south to the far reaches of innerspace. Listen to the pulsating, fuzziness of the title track from their their forthcoming album Keeper Of The Dawn.

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The Districts will release their new single Heavy Begs on 27th April, another slab of raw and energetic blues-inspired rock. Woozy guitars are grounded by a driving rhythm and lead singer Rob Grotes’ distinctive distorted vocals.

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Lastly, meet Art Nikels, a freeform blend of electronically fused psych-rock, citing influences ranging from hip-rock to kraut-höp. Hesitation Makes comes from their upcoming debut EP, Primitives.

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Mrs M's Top 20 2014

Our penultimate offering comes in the shape of Mrs Mackerel’s favourite songs of 2014…

I think, being a fish of some advancing years now, I know what I like – but at least that ranges quite widely (she says, defiantly). As usual, though, I’m late to deadline, so without further pontification or procrastination, here are my favourite songs of 2014.

20. War On Drugs – Red Eyes

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19. Cate Le Bon – He’s Leaving

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18. Mark Lanegan Band – Sad Lover

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17. The Districts – Funeral Beds

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16. Simone Felice – Running Through My Head

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15. Wytches – Burn Out the Bruise

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14. Matt Kivel – Insignificance

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13. Smashing Pumpkins – Being Beige

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12. Water Liars – Swannanoa

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11. Shovels & Rope – Evil

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10. Dead Fingers – Twisted
Husband and wife duo, Dead Fingers, produce a finger-picking good sound here. It’s a hoedown with a twist that chases a thigh-slappingly quirky rhythm. Love it.

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9. The Vacant Lots – Mad Mary Jones
An infectious, upbeat intro to the Vacant Lots: guitar-led rock’n’roll with psychedelic undertones. I’m quite partial to a bit of pscyh-rock, as it goes. The lyrics are secondary but the driving foot-tapping rhythm means you’ll be humming this for the rest of the day.

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8. Royal Blood – Figure It Out
Play this loud – very loud, actually. And ramp up the bass while you’re at it. Led Zep meets The Darkness: just over three minutes of rock fest with a rousing finale of guitar versus drum duelling that builds and builds. Epic. My rock chick alter ego is sated.

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7. The Felice Brothers – Constituents
A move away from the usual rollicking, rootsy sound that’s trademark Felice Brothers. This weaves a slower, more brooding tempo with darker overtones: And all my constituents agree/I’ve been changed like a pebble in the sea/By the politics of time/But riddle me this: what happiness is mine?’

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6. Eels – Mistakes of My Youth
Sold to me on sentiment alone. Mistakes of my youth, of my 20s, of my 30s and so on: like a cat running at a closed cat flap, we are all stuck on repeat and yes, sometimes it really does hurt. A gentle melody that meanders through wistful moments of reflection, there’s nothing surprising or unusual in this Eels offering, but many could do worse than heed the quiet, cautionary wisdom of the gravel-voiced Mr Everett.

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5. Bombadil – Have Me
I’d forgotten all about this song until recently. One man, a piano and a cello: a sad, reflective, rather beautiful lament. You won’t be dancing in the kitchen, rather gazing out of the window. ‘You can’t have everything you want/Or even sometimes what you need/Even if you need it desperately.’

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4. Sharon Van Etten – Tarifa
Here’s my slow dance for this year, complete with saxophone, courtesy of the haunting vocals of Sharon Van Etten. Small moments captured like a photograph, a song about trying to hold onto a memory; lyrics filled with regret and longing. Everyone else/Hasn’t a chance, don’t fail me now/Open arms, rest.’ Aah.

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3. Alvvays – Archie, Marry Me?
You expressed explicitly your contempt for matrimony.’ Archie does not want to get married, but hey (hey), she does. I sense trouble brewing there. Jangly indie guitars and plenty of reverb, means that if you’re dancing, I’m most definitely asking. I had to be told twice, no less, that I would (of course) love Alvvays. Obviously, I hate it when other people are right, so I’m off to see them next month with Nightshift.

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1= Jamie T – Limits Lie
Five years away is a long time musically but he’s a complicated creature Mr Treays, and all the better for it. As with many of his songs, the music belies the lyrical weight and depth; life observed with pin-sharp accuracy: Who knows where your limit, where your limit lies/ you’re given, what you’re given and now the giver must die.’ Without question, my gig of the year (Alexandra Palace), and Carry On the Grudge, my album of the year.

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1= Damien Jurado – Metallic Cloud
It’s a temporary fix/In case you don’t come down’ – and maybe it is. A lingering air of melancholy over a simple soaring musical arrangement, this is (in a way) the musical religion of Damien Jurado. All seeing, all knowing, quietly anthemic and ethereal. I played nothing but Brothers and Sister of the Eternal Son for at least the first six weeks of this year: endings and beginnings, beginnings and endings, sometimes you never know what you’re seeing.

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Special mentions:

School Run Anthem 2014:

The Felice Brothers – Cherry Licorice
Cos I’m high on Halloween candy again/And your lips are sweet as brandy.’ Yes, it’s absolutely true; I often operate in a sugar-induced trance, even while driving. This will be the last school run anthem (sniff), as primary school will be no more for my youngest after the summer. So we might as well go out on a high, with his favourite band, at their rambunctious best.

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Best Covers:

Phosphorescent – Tomorrow is a Long Time
Matthew Houck sings Bob Dylan: bellisimo.

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Low – I’m On Fire
I love Bruce Springsteen and I’ve been on fire a couple of times. Mainly because I used to wear hippy skirts, drink too much cider, and then light fragrant candles. It was a long time ago, but you know what they say about moths and flames.

Guilty Pleasure:

Lonelady – Groove It Out
Yeah, it’s disco – what of it?! I like dancing.

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And hello, hello; look who’s back…

Laura Marling – Short Movie

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Happy New Year, fishy friends.

MM's Best Of 2014 60-41

Day three of our countdown – tracks 60 through to 41 of our favourite songs of the year.

60 Cate Le Bon – He’s Leaving

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59 Jamie T – The Prophet

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58 Mark Lanegan Band – Sad Lover

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57 The Districts – Funeral Beds

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56 The Amazing Snakeheads – Here It Comes Again

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55 Sleaford Mods – Routine Dean

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54 Simone Felice – Running Through My Head

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53 Sam Doores – Drifter’s Wife

52 The Wytches – Burn Out The Bruise

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51 Sun Kil Moon – Jim Wise

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50 Early Winters – A Thing For You

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49 Smashing Pumpkins – Being Beige

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48 Matt Kivel – Insignificance

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47 Hamilton Leithauser – 11 O’Clock Friday Night

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46 Together PANGEA – River

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45 The Dune Rats – Dalai Lama, Big Banana, Marijuana

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44 Chimes – Total Sunflower

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43 Mac DeMarco – Salad Days

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42 Shovels & Rope – Evil

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41 First Aid Kit – Heaven Knows

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Check out numbers 100 – 81 here, and 80 – 61 here.

The latest instalment of our regular feature of songs you really should have wrapped your ears around in the past seven days…this week has a bumper crop of eight cracking new tunes.

1. Father John Misty – Bored In The USA
2. The Decemberists – Make You Better
3. The Dodos – Competition
4. Emmy The Great – Swimming Pool
5. The Districts – 4th And Roebling
6. September Girls – Black Oil
7. Terrible Truths – False Hope
8. Jessica Pratt – Back, Baby

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The Great Escape - A PlaylistA long drive, rain, a Prisoner Cell Block H style hotel room, discovering the camera was still at home… the initial omens for The Great Escape were not great.

Thankfully first impressions can be deceptive as Brighton is a sparky town full of quirky shops and streets, trendy young things and youthful counter-culture swagger (“I smoked 35 bongs once” being my favourite bit of eavesdropping of the night), and of course the smell of the sea.

The festival itself welcomed us with an opening set from anthemic folkies Port Isla who delivered a satisfyingly crunchy set with the driving Sinking Ship and new single Steamroller standing out for an appreciative early evening crowd.

It was on to the NME/Radar introducing showcase at the Haunt, an old-school sticky beer venue that revealed the charms of Neon Waltz’s hypnotic blend of psych-rock and subdued shoegaze that recalled Bobby Gillespie on downers, and an occasionally overly self-indulgent set of indie rock from The Districts that was distinguished by standout tracks Funeral Beds and Long Distance.

IMG_1014By now the venue was at capacity for Courtney Barnett who showed exactly why her star has been rising with a rapturously received set that mixed Dylan like lyrical stream of consciousness with a deadpan style and an intoxicating mix of grungey guitars, garage rock and slacker indie. From the glam-rock stomp of David to the brilliant Are You Looking After Yourself, a thrilling Avant Gardener and rollicking set closer History Eraser she fully deserved the protestations of love that came from the swaying, heaving mass at the front.

A packed Hope pub and long queue meant no chance of catching the Traams, and it was a case by now of finding a venue to get into. It turned out that was the nearby Dome Studio to join Chris T Popper and catch the end of an earnest set of traditional folk-rock from The Rails that was polished, if lacking a little in vitality, and a set of gently fragile torch songs from Alice Boman.

Finally the venue’s headliners (and Barry-Sean favourites) The Hold Steady delivered a bombastic set of blue collar rock with frontman Craig Finn coming across like a slightly demented Science teacher with a bad case of histrionics. To be honest, for those of us not overly familiar with the band, it all seemed a bit one-paced (as in frenetic), but the crowd were thoroughly enjoying it, mouthing lyrics and indulging in some half-hearted moshing.

Set over, we headed home to our hotel cells, sharing the neon streets with a mix of frazzled festival goers, drunks, celebrating Derby County fans, and weary musicians lugging their equipment into vans…roll on Friday.

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The Great Escape - A PlaylistToday, Chris T Popper and I are heading south to Brighton and our first visit to the Great Escape festival.

There are a whole host of bands we’re looking forward to seeing, from the South American punk-pop of Las Kellies, the angst of Gambles, the spectral folk of Mirel Wagner and the junkyard blues of the Amazing Snakeheads, to the stoned slacker indie of Dune Rats and the growling garage of Theo Verney.

Perhaps best of all though is that element of surprise, the anticipation of stumbling across something new that makes an event like this such good fun. And there is plenty of scope for that here with over 400 bands playing sets. Happy days.

Until then, have a listen to some of the highlights that we have already picked out – these are all high on our must-see list…a twenty five song salute!

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