Seven Songs You Should Have Heard This Week

1. The Dead Weather – Buzzkill(er)
2. Jason Lytle – Bell’s View
3. She & Him – Time After Time (Frank Sinatra cover)
4. Elephant Micah – By The Canal
5. Big Ups – Not Today
6. Songs: Ohia – Blue Chicago Moon (Demo version)
7. Mourn – Silver Gold

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Mad Mackerel’s Best Of The Month: October 2014

Mad Mackerel's Best Of October 2014

After a too long hiatus, we’ve resurrected our best of the month mix capturing our favourite tunes from October’s posts, plus a couple of new tracks too. So more than 25 songs to discover…dive in!

The September Girls – Veneer
Dark-hearted pop smothered in drenched feedback

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God Damn – Horus
A red-hot burning molten pot of pop hooks and grinding, bludgeoning riffs and rhythms.

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The Voyeurs – Stunners
Indie-psych rockers new single with nods to the tribal stomp of the Glitter Band and Iggy Pop to the colder, starker vignettes of Berlin era Lou Reed.

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Dirt Dress – Revelations
Cultivated racket of guitars, horns, and drums that mixes surf rock with synths in a curiously beguiling way.

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Amazing Snakeheads – Can’t Let You Go
More trashcan voodoo punk blues without parallel.

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Ultimate Painting – Ten Street
Excellent retro style, casually lacksadasical, take on jangly indie rock with echoes of Pavement and Lou Reed.

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The Wharves – The Grip
Gracefully minimal psych-rock with fuzzed out folk invoking the reverberated spook of 60s girl groups topped with crunchy guitar and thunderous drumming.

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Maggie Bjorklund – Fro Fro Heart
Brooding, profound and unforgettable standout from Danish pedal steeliest and singer’s new album.

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Gwyneth Moreland – Slaughterhouse Gulch
Perfect blend of authentic, classic country that feels as genuine as it does timeless.

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Menace Beach – Come On Give Up
Fuzzily insistent indie rock.

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Elijah Ocean – Bring It All In
Particularly fine example of classic backwoods, porch-rocking folk.

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The Brian Jonestown Massacre – Heat
Eastern tinged, gritty psychedelia.

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The Wave Pictures – Pea Green Boat
Dr Feelgood style blues riffs melded with typically quirky and literate vocals.

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Eaves – As Old As The Grave
Rich, tender, melancholia from new singer-songwriter.

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Elliott Brood – Nothing Left
Rollicking, infectious Americana cut through with bluegrass, folk-rock and a definite glam-rock flavour.

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Daddy Issues – Ugly When I Cry
Wonderful slab of downbeat grungy pop that drips with acerbic irony and a healthy dose of cynicism.

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The Don Darlings – If You Can’t Be Good
Masterpiece of southern gothic Americana

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Parkay Quarts – Uncast Shadow Of A Southern Myth
Townes Van Zandt, Warren Zevon, and Dylan are evident points of departure this lonesome tale about “two men tragically colliding in the deep south“.

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Viet Cong – Continental Shelf
Gloomy, brooding, ghostly, dissonant post-punk.

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Diarrhoea Planet – Bamboo Curtain
Catchy old-school style punk.

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Saint Agnes – Where The Lightning Strikes
Blues stomping, dirty rock n roll number with psychedelic organs, screaming guitars and haunting harmonica.

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Justin Townes Earle – Dreams (Fleetwood Mac cover)
Classic take on a classic track.

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Kyle Adem – I Go On
Haunting, satirical autobiography of loss and the person one becomes in solitude, sung with convincing desperation.

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Curtin – Big Blue Crown
Hazy track that creates a slow-burning and hypnotic soundscape.

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To finish we have new tracks from brilliant psych-rockers Pontiak, the burrowing, ominous Underneath Us Like A Snake, and Soft Fangs stunningly gorgeous and woozy Dog Park.

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More From Eaves

More From Eaves

A while ago we posted the richly tender and melancholic As Old As The Grave from the debut EP by singer-songwriter Eaves, out on Heavenly on the 10th November.

Now we have the other two tracks that make up the limited edition 7″ and digital release. Have a listen to the stark piano and vocals of Timber and the acoustic guitar led Alone In My Mind (For Mannington Bowes). These are haunting, fragile-as-gossamer songs that are as worldly-wise and weary as they are perceptive.

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New Video: Sharon Van Etten – Your Love Is Killing Me

With Are We There, Sharon Van Etten released an exceptional album this year, with a highlight (amongst many) being the dramatic Your Love Is Killing Me – a confessional that documents with unflinching honesty and intensity the final crumbling and disintegration of a relationship.

Already recognised as one of 2014’s most powerful songs we now have the long-awaited video directed by Sean Durkin (Martha Marcy May Marlene) and starring Carla Juri (Wetlands). More reminiscent of a short film than your typical music video, it is a striking visual accompaniment to one of the best songs of 2014.

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Introducing >>> My Old Dutch

Aussie duo My Old Dutch is an explosive two-piece lo-fi rock’n’roll outfit from Melbourne, bashing out 50s inspired tales of love lost, found and stolen.

First single Howlin’ Marilyn is a crankin’ two and a half minute ditty. Driven by a fuzzed-up, rocking riff soaked in magneto feedback, glued together with a thumping beat and some old school jukebox vocals. It tells the story of lust’n’love between a guy and his werewolf girlfriend.

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Mad Mackerel Recommends… Curtin

We Are Country Mice, later just Country Mice were well established MM faves and their demise was a sad day for us here. However better news is at hand as Curtin is a new band comprised of former Country Mice frontman Jason Rueger and drummer/multi-instrumentalist Austin Nelson. Their newly released album is titled One For The Doghearted, and is nine hazy tracks that create a slow-burning and hypnotic soundscape, lingering in delicate moments to great effect.

Have a listen to Big Blue Crown and I’m A Ghost.

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Video Round Up

A bunch of new(ish) videos to finish off the day for you. From Girlpool’s stripped back punk to Archie Bronson Outfit’s technicolour psych-rock by way of singer-songwriter Liam Finn’s plethora of celebrity impersonators for his track Helena Bonham Carter, Martha’s impassioned pop-punk, and the 60s garage inspired sound of The Electric Mess.

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