Posts Tagged ‘Sam Amidon’

  1. Mountain Man – Love Hurts  (Nazareth cover)
  2. Dan Auerbach – Shine On Me
  3. Mountain Goats – Etruscans
  4. Whitney – Gonna Hurry (As Slow As I Can)  (Dolly Parton cover)
  5. Los Angeles Police Department – If I Lied
  6. Moon Duo – Sevens
  7. Peacers – Jurgen’s Layout
  8. Sam Amidon – Juma Mountain
  9. Spencer Radcliffe & Everyone Else – Wrong Turn
  10. The Wooden Sky – Black Gold

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

best of the weekOnce again some cracking tuneage for you today in Part 1 of our regular weekly round-up of some of the best new releases.

We are ultra excited by the return of Justin Townes Earle and Champagne Corolla, which comes from forthcoming album Kids In The Street,  T. Hardy Morris who has shared a new track NY and Sharon Van Etten who reimagines the Skeeter Davis track End of the World for a new soundtrack compilation based around The Man In The High Castle TV series. Bonny Doon have also shared some more rolling, meditative Americana with Relieved and for the folkies we have the first taste of Keston Cobblers Club’s new album.

Big Walnuts Yonder is a new band that consists of members from Wilco, Deerhoof, Tera Melos and Minutemen and Raise The Drawbridges? is suitably manic while Sam Amidon is suitably surreal for just over 90 seconds on his First 100 Days Offering that also features Inga.

Enjoy. Check out Part Two tomorrow.

  1. Justin Townes Earle – Champagne Corolla
  2. T. Hardy Morris – NY
  3. Sharon Van Etten – The End Of The World  (Skeeter Davis cover)
  4. Big Walnuts Yonder – Raise The Drawbridges?
  5. Keston Cobblers Club – Almost Home
  6. Sam Amidon (featuring Inga) – Correspondence
  7. Bonny Doon – Relieved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Avi Buffalo – Memories Of You
2. Sam Amidon – Walkin’ Boss
3. Bass Drum Of Death – Left For Dead
4. Weyes Blood – Hang On
5. Spray Paint – Cussin
6. Los Angeles Police Department – She Came Through (Again)

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Our first visit to the brilliant Green Man Festival. Here are the twenty best things we heard, saw and discovered over the weekend.

1. The Parquet Courts live up to the hype
Like the Ramones on speed, the four-piece transcended all the hype with the set of the weekend – a thrilling, occasionally ramshackle, breakneck excursion into punk, slacker pop and moshpit heaven, and in Stoned and Starving they have a ready made classic for years to come.

2. Dancing Bears at British Sea Power
An epic, brooding, cinematic set brought to a stunning, and appropriately eccentric climax as, during Carrion, two seven foot Grizzly Bears appear amongst the audience  to dance, grapple and lead an impromptu conga.

3. John Cale and Roy Harper still cut the mustard
They may be advanced in years, but both the old boys demonstrated just why the main stage was still the perfect stage for them. First up an amiable Harper showed just why he is a primary influence on so many of today’s folk stars from the Fleet Foxes to Joanna Newsom, finishing his set of pastoral, freak tinged folk with the classic, and beautifully poignant When An Old Cricketer Leaves The Crease. Then Cale, dressed in a fetching pink suit jacket and tie with denim shorts reeled through a set that built to a fabulous pulsating climax with Fear Is A Man’s Best Friend, Nookie Wood, Satellite Walk, and a stunning version of Jonathan Richman’s Pablo Picasso.

Mikal Cronin 14. Cover versions aplenty
Cover versions abounded everywhere at Green Man. As well as Cale’s brilliant Pablo Picasso, we had Roy Harper doing Dylan’s Girl From The North CountryNeil Young covers from Low (Down By The River) and Band of Horses tearing through Powderfinger, Fanfarlo covering Orange Juice’s Rip It Up, and Mikal Cronin delivering a superb Whole Wide World, but perhaps best of all was Mo Kenney’s melancholic, acoustic take on Bowie’s Five Years – simply mesmerising.

5. Grass House are destined for big things
We’ve loved Grass House for a long time and our first chance to see them live is everything we hoped for. Outsider pop it may be, but the effortless way the band mix dusty, western twang with sinister gothic noir and use them both to weave mournfully surrealistic tales means the crowd is soon gripped. And in the hypnotic and transfixing Spinning As We Turn, the gothic blues of And Now For The Wild and the tense, sinewy I Was A Streetlight they have three singles that should be the envy of just about every other up and coming band out there.

6. James Yorkston’s Dad sings along
A wonderful set by James Yorkston and band is capped by his Dad shyly joining them on stage for a full tent a capella sing-a-long of the Ivor Cutler classic Hold The Barrel Steady.

7. Arbouretum get heavy
Sometimes you just need long hair, cool as fuck riffs, guitar shredding and fantasy led lyrics. Arbouretum were all that and more and in False Spring provided the best air-guitar moment of the weekend.

8. Public Service Broadcasting get funky
Brilliant use of humour, sound samples, computer conversations with the audience, guitar riffs, banjo and persuasive percussion meant Public Service Broadcasting managed to get the entire walled garden crowd on their feet and dancing within two songs. Whether it was a self-conscious shuffle or a full on funky freakout, resistance to tracks like Signal 30, The Now Generation and London Can Take It, proved utterly futile.

9. Barry-Sean is a Whooper
We didn’t know it before, but gradually over the three days we started hearing a few whoops and hollers from Barry-Sean. Sure he started quietly, with a couple of muted efforts for Parquet Courts and then the next day for Grass House and a couple of others, but by the tail end of the festival he was in full voice, hollering like Foghorn Leghorn for Darren Hayman, Public Service Broadcasting and British Sea Power

10. Sam Amidon’s surreal banter
Amidst a lovely set of muder ballads, love songs and a capella gospel tunes, Sam Amidon entertained royally with some surreal between-song banter, none more so than the tale of the messages he receives from Kirsten Dunst’s eyes during her films.

Green Man Main Stage11. The Green Man Stages…
Really are sublime. The Mountain stage nestles at the base of (you’ve guessed it) a mountain, the walled garden stage is simply perfect, the courtyard a delight, the hills, the steps, the views, and this year even the weather meant it was everything we hoped it would be, but expected it wouldn’t.

12. Low really are a classic band
In the press tent one desperate-to-impress young thing opined that despite the new songs not being very good, Low were still a classic band. “Really“, asked another scribe, “do you know the new songs?“, the young thing confessed he didn’t and gently, but firmly, the scribe pointed out you can’t know how good the new songs are if you don’t know them at all. Touché.

And anyway, while the set did contain bonafide classics in Monkey, Over The Ocean and Murderer, at least one of those ‘new songs”, Plastic Cup is destined for the same status.

13. Boutique camping…at our age – hell yes!
Confession time. Barry-Sean paid extra for our four man tent, already put up and waiting for us in the Tangerine field. No more cramped, and crap, single skin pop-up tents that leak and then refuse to return into the carrier you brought them in. Our smugness was unbearable when the one serious downpour of the weekend happened about 2am on Saturday night…we woke dry and warm. The most comfortable festival we’ve ever been to.

14. Edwyn Collins ripping it up
As well as Fanfarlo, Edwyn Collins treats everyone to Rip It Up during a brilliant set in the late afternoon sun.

15. The ever growing popularity of Phosphorescent
As the burgeoning crowd testifies, and indeed the number of them singing along enthusiastically to most of the set, Matthew Houck’s Phosphorescent have delivered a true masterpiece with most recent album Muchacho, and stepped up to the big league. As the majestic Song for Zula floats out across the hills beneath the setting sun, it is probably the most perfect way to capture the enchantment and good-natured magic of this lovely festival.

16. Darren Hayman’s King Charles rap
Illustrating why he is a British songwriting treasure, Darren Hayman introduces Henrietta Maria one of the standouts from 2012 historical concept album The Violence with a role-played soliloquy as King Charles that is as good as it is slightly creepy.

17. Midlake and Band of Horses rock out
Two bands joyously grabbing their headline (or near headline) opportunities on the Mountain stage to deliver crowd-pleasing country-rock with a backwoods feel. Muscular as it was tender, and perfectly matched to the atmosphere and setting of the Brecon Beacons.

18. The Allah-Lahs get groovy
Closing the night on the Walled Garden stage, the Allah-Lahs treat us to some seductive, surf-tinged psychedelia that somehow manages to be both laid back and carefree, and melancholic and nostalgic. Perfection.

19. The art of Nick Reed
In the vintage tent were a host of little stalls. In a corner were t-shirts and postcards from Nick Reed, pre-dating the wonderful David Shrigley, his is a brilliantly warped worldview told through the eyes of a scribbled dog and some scalpel sharp observations. T-shirt for teenage son duly purchased.

20. Marika Hackman enchants in the Rough Trade tent
With a crystalline voice like Nico, and lyrics that are as dark as anything we heard all weekend, Marika Hackman enchanted all who were present when she played a short acoustic set in the Rough Trade tent.

And some of our favourite songs…

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MM Shorts 325: Sam Amidon

Sam Amidon, for whom we’ve always had a soft spot here at MM, will release a new album for his new label Nonesuch on the 14th May.

Titled Bright Sunny South, Amidon himself not only sings but also plays banjo, fiddle, acoustic guitar, and piano on the record. Listen to the album track My Old Friend below.

Mrs Mackerel's TFI Friday (31st August).

I’m melting.

Well I was until earlier today. After one week in the hottest Canarian August in 23 years, my quintessentially English temperature gauge and complexion were pining for a bit of cloud control and a drop in temperature. It was, as I thought, a week spent in whatever shade I could find, book in one hand, Mr Sangria in the other. Large hat and fifties style swimsuit notwithstanding, I have managed (albeit unintentionally, but alas unavoidably) to turn – in the words of HP –  “a shade of beige”.

And despite the heat, I did find several things to amuse me, one of which dear reader I share with you tonight: the “don’t let your dog poo here” sign a la Los Cristianos (see above), where the poor mutt appears to be excreting a tripod. It’s the little things.

So it’s back to normal life this week and welcome to wistful September, one of my favourite months. All change, new starts, looking forward.

Now the football season is underway, it’s also time to follow the gospel according to St Martin. You know it makes sense: convert before ye are damned!

Right, back to those Russians…

Mrs Mackerel x

Well, technically it’s now Saturday, but here’s some sunshine for your weekend sweetly sown, just how I like it.

Download Sparklehorse – Sunshine mp3 (from Good Morning Spider)

Download Felt – Sunlight Bathed The Golden Glow mp3 (from Absolute Classic Masterpieces)

Download Sam Amidon – Walking On Sunshine mp3 (from BrooklynVegan Presents Sun Salute:  A Tribute To Katrina And The Waves For The 25th Anniversary Of “Walking on Sunshine”)

Download Kalle Mattson – Sunlight mp3 (from Anchors) (Buy or Download from here)